Best website builder for makers, sellers and doers.

Hi Donny, I think there are some drag and drop user interfaces for WordPress, but I haven't used them myself so I have no idea if they're good. But as far as I know, most WordPress users I know don't use these interfaces - maybe that's an indication that people rather bite the bullet to learn how to code or hire someone who does, rather than using these interfaces? I can't be completely sure, though. Using a hosted service really isn't terrible at all. If you are running an ecommerce store (sounds like you are since you are selling products?), platforms like Shopify is excellent. They're very scalable, and tons of tools for you to use. They have dedicated support teams so you can always reach out for dedicated help and they manage all the technical back end matters for you. Of course, if you prefer to have 100% control over everything including hosting and security, then something like WordPress will allow you to do that. Jeremy

Thanks, Jeremy, for your excellent article, but I still have a couple of questions. We use Dreamhost for our website, which was built in 1999 (seriously) and we keep it semi-current using SeaMonkey's editor. Last year we added an ECWID shopping cart to replace the really difficult to use PayPal shopping cart system, which has helped, but a replacement website that's easy to change is what we really need. It seems that all of these site builders want to host us, when what I need is a program I can use to create the new site and replace my existing one. Is there a standalone site building program you recommend? How about an easy to use interface to put between me and Wordpress? (That seems like it would be an excellent tool for someone to develop.) Or should I just buy a copy of Wordpress for Dummies and start fresh? Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
One thing we would note, however, is that it’s always best to work with a hosting provider that understands the importance of separating these different technologies from one another on the server. In other words, WordPress installations should not share space with Drupal installations. It creates for an insecure environment and can severely compromise your website’s performance.
Thx for your article Colin 🙂 As u said Joomla is great for an intranet-like web site. I made a lot of knowledge bases and a bunch of intranets with Joomla and since 1.6 version, new ACL Management helped a lot i must say. I found out very lately about WP and i think it’s like going Mac after a long period of Windows struggling (kind of). Anyway there is also a very good database based/self hosted CMS which deserves IMHO some interest: MODx. Not very well known but probably the most flexible CMS when it comes to templating. You literally design your website in Photoshop, export the HTML then put wherever you want some snippets and Boom! Incredible tool. Learning curve is however longer than Drupal, Joomla or WP obviously. WP ecosystem and simplicity out of the box + universality made it the winner. Just a thought 🙂 thx again for sharing.
The primary reason I’m looking for an alternative to WordPress is its reliance on PHP. A language so awful I wouldn’t let it anywhere near my computer if I didn’t rely on WordPress for my blogging. Using PHP as the substrate for your CMS/blogging platform guarantees you’ll have day one security problems. Just look at all of the WordPress plugins and themes that have horrible security flaws (e.g., revslider).
I’ve made some use of Kirby CMS. It’s a really well put together flat file CMS. It takes some coding out of the box to get it set up as desired, but then it’s a pleasure to use. Advantages of not having a database include simpler setup, and the ease of version control of the whole site. Statamic is a similar option, though I’ve not spent any significant time using it.	

Amazon is known for being one of the largest e-commerce platforms in the world, but were you aware that it offers one of the best web services in the world today? Well, Amazon Web Services is a secure cloud services platform that provides computing power and other functionalities to help businesses scale up. Out of all these services, we will be more interested in their hosting services and whether you can start hosting WordPress on AWS.
When we say online business and eCommerce, the first thing that comes to mind is surely Shopify! It is an amazing alternative to WordPress that allows any users to easily create your online shop! It is a simple, secure and stable platform where you can start and grow your business with very less effort. While comparing with other web hosts, it surely does not offer the same level of robustness. However, it is best known for its amazing eCommerce based features more than anything else.
If you’re knowledgeable about site building and e-commerce, you’ll find solutions on this list that give you better extension possibilities, more overall features, and the freedom to potentially do anything you want with your online store (since you’d be hosting it on your own server). That said, if you’re just getting into selling things online and want to do everything yourself, Shopify can often be a great place to start for new businesses and less technically-savvy folk!	

However, if you aren’t a blogger, you may struggle to customize your site to your liking. This is where WordPress.com falls – it starts to feel limiting when you try to create anything other than a blog with its templates. It was the platform our users were least likely to recommend after testing, and also came out last for ease of use with a score of just 3.2/5.
WordPress boasts of being easy to use for amateurs. However, their support is ludicrously awful--forums only, no backup for more difficult situations. I had an 5 yr plus site that, several dead laptops later--a lost passord & original receipt, pre-2-factor, a free site--that I have lost access to . WP kept repeatedly sending the same canned messages that gave no help at all. I've been at it for WEEKS, & though onechat person offered to send me to customer help, that never happened. I strongly recommend avoiding WordPress.

WordPress boasts of being easy to use for amateurs. However, their support is ludicrously awful--forums only, no backup for more difficult situations. I had an 5 yr plus site that, several dead laptops later--a lost passord & original receipt, pre-2-factor, a free site--that I have lost access to . WP kept repeatedly sending the same canned messages that gave no help at all. I've been at it for WEEKS, & though onechat person offered to send me to customer help, that never happened. I strongly recommend avoiding WordPress.
Note: In fact, creating a website or blog on WordPress CMS is similar to planning a trip alone. You’re planning a route, booking a hotel, and buying airline tickets and guided tours all by yourself. You also arrange getting a visa, if necessary. Conversely, using online website builders is like asking a travel agency to take care of everything: they offer you an “out-of-the-box” product. Though this comparison is too rough, I hope you’ve understood the difference.
How to Make a Website in 10 mins - Simple & Easy
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