Best website builder for makers, sellers and doers.

I agree with you that Pulse CMS offers an interesting way to go, without databases. Before moving all my sites to WP over the past two years, I had always felt reluctant to use databases: but testing WP had convinced me to go ahead. Although I do not use it at this point (I played a little bit with previous versions), I bought a Pulse CMS license, if only in order to support that interesting project. I do not rule out using it for a site some day, at least experimentally.
What Is The Best WordPress Page Builder - Beaver Builder, Divi, Elementor, Thrive Architect Compared

Hi Cedric, Have a look at this guide on mobile interfaces for drag and drop website builders. You can also build multiple sites within one user account. But if you want to subscribe to a paid plan, you will have to upgrade one website at a time. So for instance, you have 1 Wix account and within this account, you have 4 websites. You can upgrade each of the website one at a time. Jeremy	

This is a really generous free plan, with unlimited storage on offer, meaning no caps on content and pages. It’s also really quick to set up – the screenshots below show a website very much in progress, but we were able to get to this stage (and hit publish) in under two minutes. If you have an idea you want to get off the ground quickly, we think this is the best builder for the job.
Arguably one of the most flexible and easy-to-use builders, Site123 lets you customize anything and offers a one-click installation wizard with graphics and templates. Site123 stands out as particularly helpful with its free images library, professional fonts to add visual elements to your site, and creative DIY plans for creating multiple pages (which are unlimited). Plus, since it offers web hosting domain registration, 500 MB storage space, Google Analytics, and is ad-free, you won't feel pressured to switch to a paid plan.
Medium is a very interesting concept when it’s compared to its competitors. In short, it allows you to write and then publish your content alongside other authors at Medium.com. You also get to follow other people’s work and be a part of the Medium community. In other words, it’s a large web publication website where you’re one of the members and can submit your own content.
Finally, I would like also to draw attention to another interesting CMS that I used a decade ago and really enjoyed using at the time: it was originally known as Article Manager, and its current incarnation is CMS Builder, from InteractiveTools (a company based in Vancouver). At the time I was using it, I remember that the developers were very helpful, and the forum was lively and helpful too. Now that I am using WP, I would not really consider moving to CMS Builder (although I own a license), since WP offers much more in my view. But some people might have reasons to prefer it. However, one should pay attention to the fact that some of the add-ons can make it more expensive than the initial $200 price for a single site.
If you find WordPress too complicated, you can stop right here. The Joomla! CMS definitely has some nifty features built right in, most importantly, management for multilingual web pages – but it’s complicated! While WordPress sometimes almost feels like a website builder for beginners, you’ll find Joomla! much more complex. Just look at the screenshots below.
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